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Children Into Educated Citizens

Children Into Educated Citizens

Marriage Counselling: 3 Tips On How To Stop Fighting

Posted by on Jan 6, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

In 2012 alone, 49,917 divorces were granted in Australia. Although couples dream of happily ever after on their wedding day, the truth of the matter is that it may take several years of marriage for couples to finally realise that they have grown apart or are actually not compatible with one another; however, many couples simply do not possess efficient and effective communication skills. As a result, most couples spend a lot of time fighting in an unhealthy manner that damages their relationship. If your marriage is on the rocks, here are 3 tips that you can implement to stop fighting with one another.  Take A Break Before Talking It Out When getting into a fight, your stress hormones get triggered, and so does your ‘flight or fight’ response. The sympathetic nervous system will release several different hormones and chemicals, like adrenaline and noradrenaline, which impact your emotions and your ability to respond in a logical manner. As your blood pressure and breathing rate increases, you may have a hard time keeping your cool. If you find yourself getting overwhelmed by your own emotions, take a break before talking it out. It generally takes anywhere between 20 to 60 minutes for your body to return to its pre-arousal state.  Focus On The Present And Forget About The Past While fighting, many couples are tempted to bring up past issues. Not only is this discouraging, but it only causes more stress. Since the past cannot be changed, it is important to let it go and focus on the problems that you are dealing with in the present. Keep your focus on what is bothering you today, and also determine how the situation can be resolved. Although it is easy to get off-topic, it is important to stop both yourself and your spouse when this happens and get back on track. If you find that you or your spouse continuously brings up issues from the past, then it may be because it has yet to be resolved. Unresolved issues can fester and become much larger ones. It may be wise to take some time later to discuss these problems in a calm and mature manner. Take Turns Speaking Last but not least, take turns speaking. It is important to be listening when your spouse is talking. Although you may not agree with him or her, try your best to try and understand where they are coming from. When taking turns to speak, it is crucial that the listening party is not interrupting or thinking of a rebuttal. Learning how to listen can actually be extremely difficult.  Conclusion Because many couples are not familiar with techniques that are used to stop fights or prevent fights from becoming worse, older and unresolved issues become buried under newer ones. Over time, this can cause a huge strain on a relationship. If you and your spouse are both having a hard time communicating effectively and efficiently, speak with a counsellor. A professional like Inner Dimensions may be able to provide more insight into the relationship, and teach both you and your spouse some communication techniques that can greatly improve the quality of your...

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Smart Predictions: Four Simple Activities To Provoke Curiousity

Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Whether you are presenting a new topic to children in a primary school or adults in a conference room, the introduction will set the tone for the rest of the session. Facilitators often make the mistake of doing something dramatic such as telling an exciting story to gain interest. Recent studies, however, show that the Reticular Activating System in the brain makes a decision about whether or not to focus on information being presented. In order to engage this part of the brain, you must stimulate curiosity and encourage your audience to make predictions. Here are four simple smart board activities which will capture your participants and sustain their attention.  Word Clouds A word cloud generator produces an electronic mind map.  It presents words in a visual pattern which highlights the most commonly input words and makes less common words smaller. Provide a broad topic such as “Ancient Rome” or “Smart Boards”. In pairs or groups, ask your participants or students to write down the ten ideas they think that most people associate with this topic. Input these words into the generator and the cloud will instantly be created. Enlist reactions and use the interactive qualities of your board to drag words mentioned out of the cloud onto another part of the screen. Secret Picture Create curiosity by using a visual puzzle that encourages your participants to guess the topic. At a basic level, you can use the Screen Shade tool. The erase to reveal effect is another easy way to conduct this activity. Choose a picture which represents your topic. Invite participants to come to the smart board and reveal one small section. Elicit responses each time a new section is shown. Further excitement can be generated by activating the bomb timer tool for participants to beat. Blank Cartoon Predicting the missing dialogue in a cartoon can stimulate participants as they try to guess the words and wonder how it relates to your topic. For children, this is a great opportunity to use some of the fancy font tools when they write their dialogue on the smart board. Place a topic-related cartoon on the smart board with the dialogue or caption omitted. In groups, ask participants to predict the missing words. Invite one member from each group to write the dialogue onto the smart board image. Save each effort if you wish to identify which group had the best prediction when you finally reveal the original text. Timeline A timeline can encourage participants to focus on a topic and inspire them to find out more about particular events. If you wish to enhance the interactive timeline software, you can add animated images and sound effects which are activated when a participant chooses a right or wrong answer. Timeline software allows you to place an interesting list of events on one side of the white board in non-chronological order. On the other side, there will be a list of dates. In pairs or groups, ask participants to match dates and events. Nominate one member from each group to drag an event over to the dates on the smart board. Most software will cause the event to fly back to its original spot if the answer is wrong. Discuss any answers which participants found surprising. Never let your participants be distracted by toys, phones...

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What To Do When Your Child Is Not Fitting In Socially In Kindergarten

Posted by on Nov 13, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

It can be worrying as parent to see that your child is not fitting in socially in kindergarten. For children who are having trouble fitting in socially, establishing some skills to deal with larger groups of children can be extremely useful and can establish good patterns for future years. Here are some steps that can help you work through your concerns. 1. Take a deep breath Make sure that you are relaxed and actively extract your personal history and concerns from any issues your child is having. Sometimes children who are particularly quiet and introverted are intentionally playing apart from their class during break time, taking a respite from the busy (and at times noisy) environment of 20+ of their classmates. They may not be overly worried about not playing with other children, and that is perfectly age appropriate. 2. Speak to the teacher Any parent is only seeing their child in the school environment for a few moments each day. The teacher will be able to tell you if they are having issues throughout the day and if there are issues with group activities in the class. They can also keep an eye out for any excluding behaviour coming from other children and draw your child into activities with other accepting children. 3. Organise some out of school play dates Your child may find one-on-one interactions, in a more comfortable environment such as your house or a favourite playground, easier to sustain than the school yard. Ask your child and/or the teacher which children might be good playmates and invite them (through their parents) to a one-on-one play date with your child. 4. Practise structured role-playing If your child is showing some anti-social behaviour such as yelling, hitting or snatching toys, it can be useful to practise some of their more stressful scenarios with them at home and discuss the best way to deal with issues with other kids without resorting to unfriendly behaviours. Equally, for quieter children practising some assertive phrases such as “stop, I don’t like that” and walking away from arguments can help them deal with stressful situations proactively, before they end up stressed and potentially start lashing out. It’s important to remember that social skills are learnt in a similar way to other childhood skills like riding a bike: by repetition and practise. While some children may be more naturally gifted at social interaction than others in a large group, in a warm and supportive environment, all children will be able to form some close relationships with their classmates. For more information and advice, contact a business such as Erina...

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